fiber


   
This is my set up for breakfast (when kids sleep late, so yeah, not that often.) You could always get the ingredients ready beforehand and have them available. Either way,  just chop it all up and heat up a pan and you are ready to go.

Here are my ingredients:

Garlic

Onions

Chives

Fresh thyme, basil

Peppers

Shiitake mushrooms

Asparagus

2 eggs

Cooking spray

Hot sauce (optional)

  
Just sauté the veggies, mushrooms last. From here you can set aside and make an omelette or frittata or a scramble.

I opted to just do a little “Egyptian egg” (or whatever you guys call it) action.

If you cook the egg just right, it’s soooo creamy, you won’t miss the butter and cream cheese.

  
 

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Delicious Sumo Citrus fruit

Delicious Sumo Citrus fruit

I did a double take when I saw the name “sumo” as I was perusing the produce section of Whole Foods. Was this another crazy marketing ploy? First the “Paleo” section at the salad bar and now this! But it seems there is a type of mandarin orange called a Sumo Citrus. It looks a lot like those Ugly Fruits I always see but never buy (too ugly). But, any fruit named after a variation of the squat (and dead lift), not to mention a super cool sport where the athletes get to eat 10,000 calories a day is okay by me.

My sumo lunchbox from back when I was too old to be using a lunchbox.

My sumo lunchbox from back when I was too old to be using a lunchbox.

Apparently the sumo citrus (also known as Dekopon) have been in the U.S. for at least a few years and there is only a small window of time when they are available. The nutrition stats are similar to that of any orange, loads of vitamin C and potassium. Calories would be on the higher side than a normal sized mandarin orange due to its enormous size. You get a lot of bang for your buck with this fruit though. They are sweet, but, not cloyingly so and barely any acidic notes.

Best of all, you can tell scurvy to go bye bye!

Spruce up dull roasted vegetables by adding lots of color and flavor

Spruce up dull roasted vegetables by adding lots of color and flavor

I have to admit, I am not a huge carrot fan. I like them well enough, but, I don’t go out of my way to eat them regularly (I know deep in my soul this is probably a holdover from a long ago experiment with the Atkins diet, for shame!) They are a staple in my house though as a raw snack, usually with hummus and every so often they will be the steamed veggie of the night.

I don’t know about you, but, this long winter has been causing me some serious vegetable burnout, so I finally caved in and bought some of those colorful carrots I keep seeing in the food store. I know those colors provide some serious antioxidant powerhouse nutrition. I didn’t realize how gorgeous they would be as part of a meal! When I threw them in with a few other vegetables, I honestly felt like I was looking at a fruit salad. The only thing missing was a watermelon basket.

Recipe:

1-2 servings

Ingredients

4 carrots, peeled and cut into ~ 1/2 inch slices (I used purple, orange and yellow)

2 large stalks of celery, cut into 1/2 inch slices

5 medium radishes, quartered

2 pearl onions

1-2 tsp coconut oil (smeared along bottom of roasting pan)

Salt and pepper to taste

Method:

1- Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

2- Chop all vegetables while oven is heating up.

3- Smear coconut oil along the bottom of roasting pan and add vegetables to pan

4- Shake the vegetables around in the pan until they are somewhat coated with coconut oil

5- Roast vegetables ~20-30 minutes, or until fork tender.

6- Sprinkle with salt and pepper. I like to use the Pink Himalayan salt for the big crystals and a little crunch.

This whole dish clocks in at less than 200 calories and a very respectable 9 grams of fiber! Not to mention over 250% of your RDA for Vitamin A. Your night vision will thank you.

Looks good to me, I’d probably skip the Fage and just add some Sriracha, but if you don’t follow paleo, yogurt is cool

My Life Journey, unscripted and unrated...

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Not in the mood for a heavy dinner and want to feel super clean in the morning? Here is a a healthy natural diuretic mix!

– 3 steamed artichokes  – steam for an hour , then let cool , eat the leaves and work hard for that super high anti-oxidant heart!

– wok up a bunch of asparagus and a red pepper in a tablespoon of EVO with garlic and add a tablespoon of Fage 0% yogurt on top for a little kick.

Yummy in the Tummy!

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The less is more approach to kale...

The less is more approach to kale…

The influx of kale chips, quinoa chips and chia chips is kind of getting me depressed. All I can think to myself while I take them down off the shelf to look at the label is, “Just eat the flipping food! It’s not that bad actually.” Why does it have to be a chip?

Don’t get me wrong, I really like chips of all shapes, vegetables, legumes and sizes. But, it seems like food manufacturers get a little crazy with taking a hot “new” health food and pretty much turning it into a healthy junk food before anyone gets a chance to actually see if they liked the whole food in the first place.

I continue to buy kale despite it’s becoming a bit of a diva around town. I honestly really enjoy it in the easiest way possible, sauteed.

Ingredients:

1 10 ounce bag of pre-cut Kale

3 cloves garlic

2 tsp peanut oil

1/4 cup chopped cashews (optional)

1 tsp rice vinegar

Pinch of pyramid salt

Preparation:

  1. Heat a large pot until water beads up when thrown in the pot (sizzle)
  2. Add peanut oil and coat bottom of pan
  3. Add garlic and sautee for a minute or so until fragrant
  4. Add kale to pot in bunches, 1/3 at a time. Use tongs to keep turning the kale over making sure each bunch gets some coating with oil. Throw in a pinch of the pyramid salt and distribute evenly.
  5. Once all the kale is in the pot and evenly coated, turn the heat down to low and cover for about 5-7 minutes
  6. Taste the kale, make sure the texture is not too crunchy
  7. Add the rice vinegar and evenly coat
  8. Once kale is plated, add cashews for garnish

This preparation can make anywhere from 2-4 servings, I like a lot of kale so I split it in 2. One serving in this preparation packs:

Over 100% daily RDA for both Vitamins A & C

Not to mention tons of fiber, iron, copper. The list goes on and on. Guarantee you can’t get those kinds of statistics from a kale chip…

 

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Crunchy, a little salty and excellent

I LOVE hummus. It’s a staple in my house. I also love chickpeas in general, so when I came across these roasted chick peas in various flavors, I had to give it a go. Such a great idea to roast a chickpea and then add flavoring! I wish I had though of it. The nutrition stats are awesome, 5 grams of protein and fiber!!!

Packing 5 grams of fiber and 5 grams of protein, you can't go wrong!I have used them on top of salads, as part of a crunchy trail mix and as a late night snack.

Definitely check out the Thai Coconut Lemongrass, Sweet Cinnamon and Smoky Chili and Lime flavors. You won’t be disappointed!

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Feeling kinda uneasy after watching a lot of food porn at work today (don’t ask), so thought I would post my own version of food porn and also declare the hot new food trend of 2014 to be:

BRUSSELS SPROUTS!

Okay, so maybe I’m not he first person to declare this, but, I’ve seen this one coming for awhile now. Brussels Sprouts ARE THE NEW/OLD “IT” vegetable. (mark my flippin words)

Ingredients:

1 turn of peanut oil

Butter (optional)

1-2 crushed cloves of garlic

1 package of Brussels sprouts (ends cut off and cut in half)

Low sodium broth (< 300 mg per serving minimum!)

Himalayan Sea Salt (to taste)

Method:

  1. Preheat pan to medium high heat
  2. Pour one turn of peanut oil in the pan and allow to heat up to medium high heat (throw some H2O molecules in the pan to test for “hotness”),  simultaneously throw garlic smashed into pan (remove within a minute of cooking to prevent  spread of “bitter” flavor)
  3. Place Brussels sprouts cut-side down onto heated pan
  4. After halves are placed face down, pour a small amount of low sodium broth into pan, wait for “SIZZLE” and then lower heat and cover for 17 minutes over medium low heat.
  5. Sprinkle some Himalayan sea salt to taste over sprouts
  6. Enjoy!

Here’s the nutritional information for Brussels sprouts in case you are doubting the serious nutritional benefits from these MOFOs:

Brussels Sprouts Nutrient Extraaganza

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